HOW TO PRACTISE MEDITATION

Meditation is simple and easy and is one the finest ways to de-stress yourself and to relax your body and mind. It is not a complicated technique and just requires a little practise and a quiet corner in your home.

The first step is to sit down in a comfortable spot, preferably cross legged on the floor. If you want to sit on a chair go ahead and do so. You need to be relaxed through the entire process, so be comfortable wherever you are.

Close your eyes and try to stop thinking about anything at all. If thoughts do come, let them go away and gradually you will find that fewer and fewer thoughts come in, and there are more and more quiet spaces in your mind.

Pay attention to your breathing. Let it be normal, but just imagine that with each outgoing breath you are breathing out all the disturbing thoughts and you are breathing in peace and harmony. Gradually you will realise that your breathing has become slower and gentler and that your body is much more relaxed.

Give yourself time – initially do this only for a few minutes every day. The important thing is to clear your mind, concentrate only on your breathing. Thoughts will come and go – do not pay too much attention to them.

When you open your eyes after a few minutes, you will find yourself at peace, relaxed and contented. Do this regularly, and soon stress will cease to be a part of your daily life.

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17 Responses to “HOW TO PRACTISE MEDITATION”

  1. Scott from Link Building Company Says:

    I have been suffering form anxiety and panic attacks and since I have been meditating for 15mins. everyday the difference is incredible, I feel more in control and more peaceful and tolerant with the world.

  2. Mirella from elevator accident investigation Says:

    Meditation can bring about feelings of confidence and self control, increased concentration, better relationships and reduced stress levels. I have tried it and believe me all I said is true.

  3. Donovan Taylor from handbag wholesale Says:

    Once you have found your own inner stillness, through regular meditation, you will be able to access it again and again and with ever greater ease. This brings with it many far-reaching and profound benefits. You will start to notice some changes within yourself fairly quickly; others will take more time. If you are so inclined, it is worth keeping a diary, so that, after some experience of meditating you can look back on how you have changed.

  4. Matthew Robbins from dedicated server hosting  Says:

    Well meditation does not mean ‘zoning out’. In fact, regular practice will make your mind much sharper and quicker. The ability to concentrate is hugely enhanced, so that tasks take less time and feel easier to accomplish. When you decide to do something, you will be able to just do it, instead of wasting time agonizing about it.

  5. Chintan Ranchhod from Investment opportunities Says:

    I go for breath meditations mostly. Breath meditation is the best meditation for achieving complete stillness. During stillness the time disappears and you go back to the source. When you finish meditating you are full of energy and you are aware of your healthy body. You feel completely joyful and grateful for the beautiful world you are living in.

  6. Todd from Hockey Online Live Says:

    Although typical meditation is quite popular, give a try to deep meditation too. It gives many more benefits. During deep meditation you become aware of your energy, your soul and other realms. You are able to raise your vibration to the degree that you can receive communication from other dimensions.

  7. Kim Arquette from upholstery cleaning NY Says:

    I started meditating around twenty years ago, in an attempt to cure my dyslexia, and to calm down. I attended a ten-day, intensive Vipassana course in Herefordshire. The course was called ‘a gradual awakening’ – however I found it a very rude awakening indeed!

  8. Michael Stinger from Logan Airport Transportation Services Says:

    Intrusive thoughts and increased muscle tension can interfere with your sleep. It’s not surprising, therefore, that practicing meditation, with its effects of quieting your mind and relaxing your body, has been found to be an effective treatment for insomnia. Several studies have shown that regular meditation results in higher blood levels of melatonin, a hormone that plays a critical role in the regulation of sleep.

  9. Chris from mobile locksmith washington dc Says:

    I have been trying breathing meditation for a quite few time. Even though breathing meditation is only a preliminary stage of meditation, it can be quite powerful. I can see from this practice that it is possible to experience inner peace and contentment just by controlling the mind, without having to depend at all upon external conditions.

  10. Richard from las vegas wedding chapel Says:

    Hey so much of the stress and tension we normally experience comes from our mind, and many of the problems we experience, including ill health, are caused or aggravated by this stress. I have found that just by doing meditation for ten or fifteen minutes each day, we will be able to reduce this stress.

  11. Steven from college park locksmith Says:

    The main thing in starting to meditate is to just do it. Meditation is absolutely natural and normal, and once we begin it is simple to make it an integral part of our lives. Because meditation concerns our own heart and soul, it turns out to be very intimate and familiar to us. Like a close and faithful friend, our meditation will be something that we know very well and is always there for us.

  12. Sam Muller from Computer support in Windsor Says:


    Hello,
    I have been meditating with LF for 10 months nearly, and found it to be wonderful, a gentle guiding hand to meditation experience.
    At this stage I am learning to allow whatever sensation begins in my mind to grow without exercising any judgment, by which i mean avoid framing as is that habit of the mind, It is so good to let it follow its own form . So there are surprises.
    Also I find myself increasingly aware of the sensations of the world around me, and this year has been fresher than I can remember since I was young. I find myself stopping and taking in the smell of the air or enjoying the light, and allowing it to open the doors to whatever memories are tucked away and bask in the sensation.
    So thanks to Michael for working with this.
    My life is so much sweeter for it.

  13. Tom from Cad Training Courses Says:

    I can give you another aspect of my meditation experience was pretty deep and far reaching. I was feeling whatever came up, and I noticed a feeling generated in my head. I was shocked and very disturbed to discover that I felt as though I was asleep! Not physically asleep, but mentally asleep. I WAS sleepy at the moment, but this pointed to a deeper issue. It was a feeling that suggested to me I was not really awake and experiencing reality. Is not this what enlightenment is? “Waking up,” and finally taking in all the sensory data available? I am sure that there are other aspects to enlightenment, but this is definitely a key component.

  14. Godfrey Miles from locksmith denver  Says:

    Just as a writer only learns the spontaneous freedom of expression after years of often gruelling study, and just as the simple grace of a dancer is achieved only with enormous, patient effort, so when you begin to understand where meditation will lead you, you will approach it as the greatest endeavor of your life, one that demands of you the deepest perseverance, enthusiasm, intelligence, and discipline.

  15. Brent from Affordable Art Says:

    I would strongly advise everyone to start with a serious course in meditation in a centre or group under the guidance of an experienced teacher, preferably at least with a few days in silence. This should give you a genuine feeling of the effect that meditation can have on the mind. Many people try to teach themselves meditation by reading books etc., but I can’t remember ever meeting an enthusiastic self-taught meditator. So a proper course, if possible with a qualified teacher is invaluable. Furthermore, one should realise that continuity in meditation is considered essential: better five minutes a day, every day, than two hours once a week. For example, five minutes in the morning are likely to become longer over time, and can easily become part of your everyday life.

  16. Ayanda from Bands South Africa Says:

    I had an almost feeling of being invisible once while looking at the mirror. Actually most of my meditations start as concentration or empty mind meditations, but they sometimes evolve into this kind of thing. I’m not sure if I should allow this or hold it back. I feel like I should be allowing it as long as it feels good.

  17. Scott from Storage Facility Says:

    Many people have discovered that meditation quickly becomes more essential and helpful than a good breakfast or ‘the first cup of coffee’ in the morning. In the evening, it can be a good way to stop the worries of the day and go to sleep in a comfortable state of mind. People who have problems getting to sleep may discover that with an evening meditation just before going to bed, the mind becomes much calmer and getting to sleep is no problem anymore. Ultimately, meditation can become a continuous state of mind, but that obviously takes a lot of training/habituation.

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